Bob Hopkins

Articles by Bob Hopkins:

Old Doctor McEwan

Local doctors have often adopted other duties leading to their becoming pillars of the community. That was most certainly so during the late 19th and early 20th Century in Prestonpans, East Lothian when Dr William Crawford McEwan practised.

Read the rest of this entry »

line

Livingstone’s Pathfinder

At the east end of Ormiston Main Street in East Lothian, stands the obelisk which is a lasting memorial to perhaps the village’s most famous son. The monument, of Peterhead granite, rises to a height of some twenty feet, bears a bronze figurehead and the name Moffat.  Paid for by public subscription and unveiled in April 1885 in memory of Robert Moffat – someone who would bring lasting recognition to the village.

Read the rest of this entry »

line

Forgotten Achiever

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Lady Susan Grant Suttie was an important figure of Prestonpans life and was certainly responsible for preserving the Grant Suttie Dynasty when it could have been easily destroyed. Unfortunately her achievements occurred when there was a Victorian propensity to ignore female accomplishments and there is no biographical record of what she did.

Read the rest of this entry »

line

The Lepers and the Balm Well

The original name of Liberton – a village some three miles from Edinburgh centre – may well have been Lepertown, or the town of lepers because, when leprosy was  prevalent during the Scottish Middle Ages, the unfortunates who suffered that terrible disease were confined to the then village and absolutely forbidden to approach the City of Edinburgh.

Read the rest of this entry »

line

The Legacy of Doctor Knox

The surname Knox is, in a Scottish context, invariably linked to the Calvinist reformer John who, by some, is credited with the favourable enhancement of souls. However, some two centuries after the reformer’s death, another Knox, Robert, was certainly of more physical benefit to the population of Scotland – and indeed internationally.

Read the rest of this entry »

line