Alex Wood

Alex Wood has had a varied career in education. He started as an English teacher at Edinburgh’s Craigroyston High School in 1973 and completed his school-based work as Head Teacher at Wester Hailes Education Centre in 2011. In between he worked in community education, was a Learning Support teacher, headed a behaviour support unit, was Head of a special school and worked in Edinburgh’s Education headquarters. He is a member of the Education Committee of St George’s School. Alex is now an Associate at the Scottish Centre for Studies in School Administration (SCSSA) at Moray House and is Secretary of the Scottish Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (SELMAS) as well as being a free-lance writer. His experience however ranges well beyond the worlds of schools and education. For seven years in the 1980s he was an elected member of Edinburgh District Council and he retains a keen interest in the political world. He has a long involvement in genealogy and family history, as a researcher, teacher and writer. He is a member of Edinburgh Common Purpose’s Advisory Group and of the committee of Linlithgow Book Festival. Although he has lived in Linlithgow for over 20 years, and in Edinburgh for the previous 18 years, he remains a loyal fan of his home town football club, Brechin City.
Articles by Alex Wood:

Children’s Book Review: Gobbolino the Witch’s Cat

There’s a delightful irony in the publishers sending me Ursula Moray Williams’s Gobbolino, the Witch’s Cat, (MacMillan, RPP £9.99) to review.  Both as a teacher and a parent I enjoy children’s literature and I love animals.  Unfortunately, as all my best friends know, while I have no problem with a slobbering, or even a growling, dog and while many of my best friends are horses, I’m not a cat person.  Professionalism triumphed however, and as I read the book, directed I think at children between 7 and 10, I was sucked into the adventures of Gobbolino, the naïve kitten with the blue eyes and one white paw.

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Power to the People

In 2011, North Edinburgh Social History Group published ‘Never Give Up’, a vibrant history of social issues and campaigns in North Edinburgh over a period of 70 years.  We reviewed it in Lothian Life  a review which excited considerable interest.

The North Edinburgh Social History Group, based at the recently refurbished and state-of-the-art Royston-Wardieburn Community Centre, now has a new venture.

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West Lothian Writer hits the Watershed

Peter Wright is a well-known character in Linlithgow and in the wider Lothians. Aged 64, he lives in Linlithow and is one of a diminishing number of people who left school (legitimately), at the age of 14. After a Liberal Studies course atNewbattle Abbey College he set out on a career in youth work.   He was for 20 years, manager of the Duke of Edinburgh`s Award in the Edinburgh area, and was awarded the MBE for this work.  In the 1990s, he restored Niddry Castle, near Winchburgh, as a private residence.

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Death of a Chief

Douglas Watt lives in Linlithgow with his wife Julie and their three children. He is the author of The Price of Scotland: Darien, Union and the Wealth of Nations, a history of the Darien Disaster and Parliamentary Union between Scotland and England as well as a published poet. Douglas Watt has now turned to fiction.  His recent, and now reissued, first novel, Death of a Chief, (Luath, RPP£6.99) is the promised first in a series of pre-Enlightenment crime novels, featuring John MacKenzie, a Gaelic-speaking and widowed Edinburgh Advocate of Highland family with a forensic mind and melancholic tendencies.

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Leaving Alexandria

Richard Holloway is well known for BBC Radio Scotland’s Sunday Morning with Richard Holloway.His relaxed, informative style makes a highly attractive programme. He was previously an Anglican priest, Episcopal Bishop of Edinburghand Scottish Episcopal Primus.
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A Time of Tyrants, Scotland and the Second World

Trevor Royle’sA Time of Tyrants, Scotland and the Second World War (Birlinn, £25.00)starts symbolically with the Empire Exhibition in Bellahouston Park, Glasgow, in 1938. Glasgow perceived itself as ‘the second city of the Empire’ and with some legitimacy.

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