Lothian Animal Life

After previously looking at local plant life, Anthony Poulton-Smith examines the etymology of fauna in the Lothian region:

The best-known and most easily recognised animal is the fox. Minor changes in pronunciation can be traced back through time in Saxon vohs, Proto-Germanic fuh, all the way back to Proto-Indo-European puk meaning ‘tail’.

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A Rose By Any Other Name

Anthony Poulton-Smith considers Lothian Floral Etymologies…

Ever since the ice sheets receded at the end of the last ice age our islands have been home to a rich variety of flora. Whenever we travel through the countryside, walk in the park, or even just look out of our windows, it is the plant life which turns a landscape into a view.

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Wonderful Williamston Wood

Devils Ditch and Wonderful Williamston Wood have been chosen by local children as names for two woods in Livingston cared for by the Woodland Trust Scotland.

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Further Collaboration on Research at Edinburgh

Two leading institutions which have worked closely on attempts to produce Britain’s first panda cub have strengthened their relationship at a ceremony in Edinburgh. The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) and the University of Edinburgh signed a five-year Memorandum of Understanding to encourage further collaboration on a range of research projects and RZSS activities.

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Water is My Life

As Greek mythology would have it, the water of Lethe was one of the rivers of the underworld: the river of forgetfulness. It flowed through the lair of Hypnos, god of sleep, where its calm, murmuring waters would induce drowsiness, make travellers forget the troubles of their past . . . Read the rest of this entry »

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Celebrating seabirds on the May

A two-day seabird celebration will take place on the Isle of May national nature reserve on the 14-15 June. Organised by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), there will be experts on hand to talk about the puffins and other birds which make the Isle of May so special. The open weekend will also include story-telling, singing and face-painting.

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