Love Denied – Margaret Lynette Sharp

Elizabeth teaches piano from the drawing room of her family home. She’s thirty-one, she lives with her overbearing parents, and it’s 1950s Australia – it’s time for a life of her own.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Dinner at the Blaws-Baxters’ – Andrew Sclater

Andrew Sclater’s first collection of poetry, Dinner at the Blaws-Baxters’ is both a celebration and lamentation of his ‘noble and ignoble ancestry’ with all the comedic and tragedic moments that suggests.

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The Making of Mickey Bell – Kellan MacInnes

Mickey stubs out his roll-up and lies on his back watching the clouds drift across the sky over Slioch. On the iPod the faint rough voice of Rufus Wainwright singing Across the Universe. Read the rest of this entry »

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WWOOFing North and South

I might as well be upfront about it, that when I opened Margaret Halliday’s latest memoir (on Kindle so the front cover wasn’t immediately obvious) I was expecting a doggy tale.

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The GFG in Scots

Yes, before you raise your eyebrows at me, that is the famous children’s book by Roald Dahl book but translated into Scots it becomes the Guid Freendly Giant. As we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Roald Dahl’s birth, there is renewed interest in his work and the GFG is the most recent of a series of Scots language books from the remarkable imprint that is Itchy Coo.

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Spellchasers – Lari Don

I’ve just read what I’m sure is going to be the next ‘big thing’ in children’s books – the first of the Spellchasers series, by Lari Don.

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